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9 Symptoms of Dog Heatstroke in Santa Clarita, CA

Dogs with heatstroke only have a limited time to get help before it is too late. As a pet owner, recognizing the signs of dog heatstroke is critical so that you can be sure you are able to save your pet. Make sure that you are aware of the early warning signs that your dog has heatstroke before you take your pet camping, on a hike, or with you on a run.

Dogs with heatstroke have about 30 minutes to get help before it is too late to save them. The symptoms that you notice in the early stages will be the difference between your dog getting cooled off and getting fluids in time to support their internal organs and bring their temperature down.

If you are ready to learn more about the symptoms of dog heatstroke in Santa Clarita, you need to read on!

What Are the 9 Symptoms of Dog Heatstroke?

Dog heatstroke can be hard to spot at first if you are not paying attention to your dog’s behavior on a hot day. Dogs pant when they exert, even on a cold day, so it can be easy to assume that your dog’s behavior is normal. You will need to be paying attention to the rest of your dog’s behavior to notice the early warning signs of heatstroke.

These are the 9 symptoms of dog heatstroke. Your dog can easily escalate from panting and drooling to collapse, so it is good to be aware of all of the symptoms that might indicate that your dog is suffering from heatstroke.

  • Excessive panting with very rapid breaths
  • Stumbling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Loss of coordination
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Reddened gums
  • Collapse
  • Loss of consciousness

By the time that your dog has collapsed, they could be minutes away from death. You will want to be sure that you are noticing symptoms like excessive panting and drooling well before loss of coordination starts to set in. This is one of the keyways to prevent a serious situation for your pet.

How Can I Help My Dog Avoid Heatstroke?

By keeping the following in mind, you can protect your dog from heatstroke.

Check the Temperature

The first thing that you will need to do is make sure that you are aware of the temperature outside. When it is more than 80 degrees out, it is always best if your dog stays home where it is cool. Dogs are not able to cool themselves as efficiently as humans, and hot pavement can burn their feet when it is this warm out. You do not want to create a situation where your dog will be overheated no matter what and being aware of the ambient temperature is the first and most important way to avoid giving your dog heatstroke.

Make Sure Your Dog is Drinking Water

The other consideration that you need to have in mind is that an exerting dog might not think to stop to drink. And then what happens if you are in an area where there is no dog watering station? Your dog needs a lot of water to be able to replace the fluids that are lost when exerting and to cool off their body when playing or even walking or jogging. Make sure that you always bring a collapsible dog water bowl with you when you are away from home and some water that is for your dog. If you are bringing bottled water with you on your hike, make sure that your dog has a few bottles assigned to them as well. Being able to give your dog access to water is critical even when the temperatures are not that high.

What Do I Do If My Dog is Showing Signs of Heatstroke?

If your dog is showing signs of heatstroke, follow the steps below to get them the care they need.

Go to the Veterinarian

The first and most important thing that you need to do is get your dog to the veterinarian. The vet will be able to give your dog IV fluids that will support their internal organ function and help bring down their body temperature. They will also be given electrolytes to try to prevent damage to the organs and to help protect the heart in particular. Your vet will probably keep your pet overnight to monitor their organ function and their temperature before releasing them to you the next day.

Get Your Dog in the Shade and Cooled Off

However, if you are not as close to a vet as you would like to be, the first thing that you need to do is get your dog into the shade. You will also want to get your dog cooled off, which could mean that you take them into a lake or a river and get them wet, or it might mean that you use a wet towel or article of clothing to cool them off. You can also offer water at this point, and dogs that are not too affected might be able to drink some to help ward off dehydration.

Have the Vet Evaluate Your Dog

No matter how stable you think your dog is after your efforts to cool them off, they should go to the vet for evaluation. Even mild heatstroke can cause organ damage, and you will want to be sure that you are not ignoring a potentially lifelong issue that could impact your dog’s health after their heatstroke. You will want to have them evaluated to be sure that they have not suffered long-term injury from the event.

Recognizing Heatstroke is Critical to Saving Your Pet

The best way to save your pet from heatstroke is to prevent them from exerting when it is very hot. If your dog has gotten too hot, you will need to know the warning signs of heatstroke so that you can get them cooled off right away and get them to a vet for medical care. Never ignore heatstroke symptoms as this is a very serious condition and one that can kill a dog in a very short period of time.

If you believe that your dog is showing early signs of heatstroke, it is always better safe than sorry. Taking your dog to the vet is always a good idea if you believe that your pet is suffering from the early stages of heatstroke.

If you have questions about dog heatstroke or would like to book an appointment, call Stevenson Ranch Veterinary Center at (661) 799-0655 or use the online form.

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